Friday, April 18, 2014

More Outtakes

Lucky Lounge. Austin, TX, 2006.
Underground @ KUT. Austin, TX, 2006.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Outtakes

Skater. Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 
Witch's Hat Depot. South Lyon, MI

Boats. Cape Cod, MA

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Lone Moments #2

I have an SLR now! I picked up an old Canon AE-1, and fitted it with an FDn 24 f/2. Great wide-angle lens, and a classic camera. Even more than that, I am just blown away by the newness of the experience. I'm loving that I can actually frame my shots exactly as I see them. Now that I control more of the process, I feel more in control of my subject. Here's a few from last week. Full frame, and exactly as they are.
UM Campus, Ann Arbor, MI


UMMA, Ann Arbor, MI

Lone Moments #1

A lone moment. — Diversey Station. Chicago, IL. 

A lone moment. Jones Beach. New York.

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Monday, March 31, 2014

Marche du Nain Rouge








Alone in Detroit




Sunday, March 30, 2014

On Horseback in the D


Sunday, March 16, 2014

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Traverse City and Northern Michigan

Glen Haven, MI

Glen Haven, MI

Traverse City, MI

State Theatre. Traverse City, MI

Traverse City, MI

Sleeping Bear Dunes

Sleeping Bear Dunes

Glen Arbor, MI

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Portraits Around Town

Lately, I've been focusing on taking portraits. I am finding that most people don't really mind having their portrait taken at all, and in many cases, they are practically begging for recognition. I see these people everywhere — alone at a table in a restaurant, on an empty, soggy street corner, or just at home, in the solitude of reflection. There's something about a portrait that can be strikingly real, even if the picture is prompted. It's the presence of the camera that prompts a self-reflective state of mind. Each person is given a momentary opportunity to come to terms with their own body, and react to the thought of their image as self. Some smile, some stare, but each person feels, for just a moment, as if they are the center of their own attention — as if they are holding the camera and I am just a bystander. Finding comfort with the camera is coming to terms with one's own flesh.